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      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      "Villiers" Lathe


      A mystery lathe - but undoubtedly from the first two decades of the 20th Century and looking remarkably like an epicyclic-backgeared Pittler Model B.  However, a machine examined several years ago by a friend of the writer was similar; the seller believed it to be a Pittler but, upon examination (and like this "Villiers"), it had several significant differences including: generally heavier castings; screwcutting by ordinary spur gears (replacing the complex Pittler worm and bevel gear drive) and a rather conventional-looking slide-rest assembly with a micrometer dial and balanced handwheels (instead of crank handles) fitted to all the screw feeds. It was also marked for "George Adams" of London - the well-known Pittler agents and a company known to have commissioned copies of many high-quality European machine tools for sale under their own brand. It might be that this is a version of the Pittler clone made for George Adams by the English Milnes Company, an example of which passed through the writer's hands during the 1980s,

      The "Villiers" Pittler-like lathe

      Also a Pittler--but not a Pittler: a "copy" built by Henry Miles for the London Pittler agents George Adams & Co.


      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      "Villiers" Lathe
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