<code id="sa0bz"></code>
    <th id="sa0bz"></th>

  1. <strike id="sa0bz"></strike>
      <strike id="sa0bz"></strike><del id="sa0bz"><small id="sa0bz"></small></del>
      <th id="sa0bz"><video id="sa0bz"></video></th>

      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
      Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
      Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

      Small Hand-operated Planers
      Example No. 1
      - typical types from unknown makers mid 1800 to early 1900s -

      Unknown Planers Example No. 2   Unknown Planers Page 3


      A remarkably versatile yet essentially simple and cheaply constructed machine tool, the planer is able, in a limited space, to handle large components that would otherwise require the services of a huge, expensive and heavy milling machine. Indeed, so adaptable is it, that even very old ones, fitted with powered milling heads on the bridge and uprights (when they are known as a plano-miller), can still be found working in shipyards and other places dealing with large and awkwardly-shaped components For the amateur the benefits of the shaper were also recognised and from around 1870 to 1920 a number of miniature versions were manufactured; even today these are still sought-after machines, very handy as a working tool and, of course, as an interesting and mechanically delightful artefact. Of a type still illustrated in some of the hard-bound catalogues of the larger machine tool dealers as late as the 1930s, the examples below are typical of the hand-operated models offered to amateurs and smaller professional workshops. While some are now relatively well known, for example: T.Taylor, Milnes, Senior, Fomm, Selig Sonnenthal, Kennan, Hesketh Walker, Brittain, Kennan, Britannia many others remain unrecognised as they (in common with some other small machine tools of that time) lacked any maker's mark.
      If you have a small planer of any description, known or unknown, the writer would be interested to hear from you.

      Visible in this picture is the mechanism that automatically indexed the cutting tool across the head

      Elegant casting--and, at the near end, can be seen the "inverted" V-ways to guide the carriage.

      On this model the designer took care to extend the cross-had ways to allow the machining on components wider than the table

      Typical of its era the clapper box was lightly built.


      Nuts and bolts from the pre-WW1 era can be recognised by their unnecessarily generous proportions

      The striker arm used to index the bridge-mountedtoolpost

      Simple indexing mechanism used to move the cutting tool across the bridge


      Unknown Planers Example No. 2   Unknown Planers Page 3

      Small Hand-operated Planers
      Example No. 1
      - typical types from unknown makers mid 1800 to early 1900s -
      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
      Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
      Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories




      ǮֻϷ