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      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      Toledo Lathes - USA


      Founded in 1888, the Toledo Machine and Tool Company (of Toledo, Ohio, USA) at first specialised in heavy types of metal working equipment including open-back, straight-side, double-crank, punching and horning, toggle-drawing, screw and trimming presses, horizontal bending machines, drop hammers, shears and machinery for the manufacture of pierced tinware and stoved parts. In addition to listing a total of twenty-eight different machine types in their 1909 catalog,  they also advertised the ability to construct special sheet-metal working machinery to a customer's particular requirements. The firmwas developed under the direction of Henry Hinde who, in 1890, purchased an interest in the concern when it has just 20 employees and a value of around  $30,000. In November of the same year the company was incorporated and Mr. Hinde named as president and general manager. In 1897 Hinde and his brother Louis bought the company and acquired property at Hastings and Dorr Streets where a factory, named by them as the "Plant No. 1" was erected. In 1918 further expansion took place with a new factory being built at Westwood Avenue and Dorr Street, a location that also became home to a foundry at first able to produce 1200 and eventually 2,200 tons per month. By the early 1920s the company had  over 1600 employees and were one of the leading producers of power presses in the United States; in 1922 a controlling interest was purchased by a brokerage house for $4,000,000 and by the 1930s the firm had been absorbed into the E.W. Bliss group. Hinde, by now a very rich man, retired.
      In 1989 Bliss were purchased by a the Japanese Company AIDA and today operate as  AIDA-BLISS with factories in Derby, England, Malaya, Japan and the USA all still producing presses and ancillary equipment.
      In 1896, just before he purchased the company,  Hinde appointed a new president, Grafton Acklin, under whose guidance the firm expanded into overseas markets with their presses to be found, for example, in the rapidly expanding factories of British bicycle manufacturers. By 1900 the company had begun the manufacture of machine tools including planers, boring mills and simple lathes; they were also quick to spot the almost unlimited market that would shortly emerge for the stamped parts necessary for automobile mass production and introduced a range of fast-working machines especially designed for that purpose. In  1911, when he was nearly 60 years of age, Acklin left to form his own company, Acklin Stamping, a concern that, together with his three sons, he oversaw until his death in 1926 at the age of 74.
      The lathes made by Toldeo Machine and Tool were not of the conventional backgeared screwcutting type but metal-spinning and trimming lathes, designed to be useful to manufacturers engaged in the production of metal containers. Although all the lathes below date from 1909, they are representative the type manufactured by the company from around 1900 until World War 1.

      The "baby" of the Toledo lathe the 16-inch swing spinning lathe weighed a modest 600 lbs and was designed, according to the makers for: spinning, trimming, flanging, curling and wiring edges; for burnishing pressed, stamped or drawn work in brass, copper, tin, aluminium, steel or black iron.

      A specialised machine the "Double-head drilling lathe" designed to bore holes through the D part of shovel handles and able to drill two holes from each side meeting in the centre "thus making a neat, uniform appearance where the rivets enter" A fifth or extra spindle could be used to counter bore the holes so that the job was finished at one setting.

      Model 324 (No. 4) 20-inch swing 1300 lb spinning lathe with 2.5-inch wide, 3-speed flat-belt drive. The lathe is shown equipped with the "plain" tilting attachment able to both do beading (or "curling") rolls and a trimming cut

      Model 325 (originally the No. 5) 24-inch swing 1900 lb spinning lathe shown complete with a range of accessories including a screw-feed compound slide rest, spinning roll, tilting attachment with beading roll, trimming cutters and an adjustable, moveable tailstock with quick-action rack-and-pinion drive. This slightly less powerful model was fitted with a 3-speed drive system that used belts 3 inches wide.

      Originally cataloged as the No. 6 lathe, this massive 3400 lb machine was subsequently referred to as the Model 326 and supplied as standard with an 80-inch long bed and a swing of 30 inches. Driven by a 4-inch wide flat belt from a 200 r.p.m. countershaft, the lathe would have had adequate reserves of power to spin thicker-than-normal work - as well as being suitable for heavy-duty burnishing and bead turning on larger diameters.
      Made from a high-carbon hammered steel (almost certainly from small-scale crucible production) the headstock spindle ran in plain bronze bearings and was formed (for the day) with a large abutment flange to better support to spinning and trimming chucks and other screw-on fittings.
      Both screw and quick-action, lever-controlled slide rest were offered, the customer able to choose any combination required to suit his style of working. The "burnishers", equipped with roller rather than the than more common bushes, were held in heavily-constructed blocks; a special tilting rest (shown on the floor in front of the lathe) was adapted to take cutters and tooling for beading work and is shown with a cutter head mounted for trimming work.


      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      Toledo Lathes - USA
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