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      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      PALLAS MILLING MACHINES
      Pallas continued on the Home Page & Page 3

      All-geared Pallas V1 vertical miller as produced from the late 1930s until the early 1960s
      Not significantly larger than the V.O. model the Pallas V1 vertical miller was a much more modern design with a quick-change, all-geared spindle drive. The pyramid-shaped main column was dowelled and bolted to a heavy cast-iron base plate that doubled as the coolant tank - a splendid idea until it comes to the task of cleaning it out through the miserably small access holes provided. The knee casting was especially stout, ran on ground-finished square-section ways and was elevated through its 14" of travel by a telescopic screw with a ball-race thrust.
      With a working surface of 30" x 8? the table had a deep coolant-collection trough and three 9/16" T slots spaced 1?inches apart; longitudinal travel was 18" and cross travel 6?. Power was fitted to the long travel only with six rates of feed from ? to 5" per minute with engagement and reverse under the control of a single lever. As on other Pallas millers the table's power feed was taken from the main drive - though improved in this case by the use of an independent gearbox with selection of feeds by two concentric rotary levers. For hand feeds a long lever was fitted to one end of the table, which gave the operator a chance for a quick if energetic return, with an ordinary circular handwheel, for delicate feeds, at the other.
      While the head fitted to the cheaper model V.O. had a conventional sliding quill that used on the V.1. was completely different: the head was a two-part assembly with the rear section fastened to a circular flange on the top of the column; the back section was formed with 90?ways on its front face and in these ran the front part complete with its Timken taper-roller bearing spindle - a design also used by the English maker Marlow.  Final drive was by spiral bevel gears lubricated from a separate oil well in the top of the head.
      Able to be rotated 45?degrees each side of vertical the head had 2?-inches of sliding movement under the control of a circular handwheel working though worm-and-wheel gearing with both a micrometer dial and a micrometer-collar stop (on the left side) graduated in increments of 0.002". The spindle carried a No. 3 Morse taper and had 6 speeds from 75 to 750 rpm - barely fast enough even in the 1940s.
      Housed in the bottom part of the column the electric motor drove upwards by V-belt to a "constant-speed" pulley running on two ball races. From there the drive to the spindle was through a gearbox with the splined shafts in nickel steel, running on ball races and properly lubricated by a pump.
      Early machines had a gear-driven coolant pump but later models were afforded the luxury of a more powerful electrically driven unit flange-mounted onto the left-hand face of the baseplate which also doubled as the coolant storage tank; this looked to be a compact and space-saving solution but was one that quickly found disfavour when the time came to clean it out..

      The Pallas V1 in its final form - largely unchanged apart from minor switch-gear revisions

      Marked "Foreign" and not "British Made"  this round overarm Pallas miller (above and below in B & W photographs) is of an older patter than others illustrated in this section of the Archive. Despite being significantly different in many aspects of its design it does, however, show certain details that hint at Pallas influence including the style of the 4-spoke handwheels and the very distinctive domed top to the table feed-screw end brackets. For what would have been a lowered-priced machine the specification was very reasonable with unusually long ways beneath the table - and even a helical speed-reducing lathe-like "backgear" built into the drive spindle. The gearbox for the table power feeds was neatly enclosed and the engagement mechanism for the table feeds, together with its automatic knock-off mechanism, all neatly engineered.

      A previous owner has converted one of the original flat-belt pulleys to a twin V

      Helical "backgears" of the "foreign-made" Pallas miller.

      Table feed gearbox (driven from the flat pulley above) and the backgear selection lever

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      PALLAS MILLING MACHINES
      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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