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      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      The "Lincoln" Lathe

      Discovered amongst the library of material once stored by the original Myford Engineering Company of Beeston, Nottinghamshire, this simple, singled-sided sales sheet for the "Lincoln" must have been retained either as a reference for what the competition was offering during the late 1920s to late 1930s or, possibly, sold by Myford themselves during their first year or two in business. As the flyer was accompanied by a high-quality maker's publicity photographs that would have been used by the printer to produce the sales literature, this does reinforce the suspicion that Myford were marketing this lathe alongside their own during the early 1930s.
      Also found in the files was another previously unknown lathe, the B.S.W. - this being almost identical to the well-known Randa (Ross & Alexander) Type B and available (as was the Randa) with 12 or 20 inches between centres and the option of either a snap-in-and-out single leadscrew clasp nut or a double type engaged by a snail cam.
      As the name Lincoln is in parenthesis, the makers was certainly not a company called "Lincoln", but Portass, in Sheffield, who marketed the lathe using the name "Junior". However, although the "Lincoln" was advertised as having a centre height of just 2
      1/8", the Portass version was listed as being considerably larger at 3" - though an explanation being found in the fact that Portass made many versions of their lathes for sale by third-party companies* and were adept at combining parts from different models to a customer's particular requirements. The Junior is known to have been offered in at least two versions, one with a flat top to the bed and every other component, apart from the headstock different in detail. The "Lincoln" was even very similar to better-specified, miniature backgeared and screwcutting model sold under the Zyto brand, even to the single swivelling top slide -though without a T-slotted top to the saddle.
      * Examples include: Gamages, Altona, A.T.M., B.I.L., Bond's Maximus, "Eclipse" (for the Sheffield hand-tool makers James Neil & Sons) Excel, G.A. (George Adams), Gamages, Graves, James Grose Ltd. of London (the latter chiselling off the Portass name and substituting their own badge), Juniper, Randa, Temmah, Wakefield, Woolner and Zyto.


      High-resolution images - may take time to load


      Found in the Myford Archive together with the sales flyer for the "Lincoln" was this high-quality maker's publicity photograph for the Portass "Junior".  This discovery lending weight to the suspicion that Myford were marketing this lathe during the early 1930s

      Portass Junior - less its tailstock

      With obvious similarities - another version of the Portass Junior


      The "Lincoln" Lathe

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      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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