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      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      lathes.co.uk
      Klopp Milling Machines - Germany

      Klopp FW 1100, FWU 1100, FW 1300, FWU1300 and FWSU 1300

      A set of catalogues is available for Klopp machines

      Klopp Shapers Web Page


      Manufactured by Klopp-Werke Gm, bH, in Soligen-Wald, a small town south of the main Ruhr industrial area and once famous as the "City of Blades" - or "Edge Trade" - where high-quality items in hard steel were made including swords, knives, scissors, razors and cutting tools.  While Klopp are best known for the wide range of shapers and slotters, their range of milling machines appears to have been somewhat limited - that is, if evidence of those imported to the UK can be relied upon. 
      Klopp revealed something of their background in the machine tool industry in a catalogue issued during September, 1960:
      We have been making machines since 1910. Originally they were all special machines. We took up the manufacture of high-speed shaping machines at the end of the First World War and already at that time had a team of specialists at our disposal. On the occasion of our fiftieth anniversary we looked for the oldest K LO P P high-speed shaping machine still in use. Among the large number of machines built in the early years we found a KLOPP high-speed shaping machine made in 1918. This was taken back by us in February 1960, and in exchange the owner was given a brand-new high-speed shaping machine No. 43007 from the latest batch.
      By the late 1950s the range of Klopp milling machines exported to the UK consisted of the horizontal, knee-type Models FW 1100, FWU1100, FW 1300, FWU 1300 and the combined horizontal and vertical FWSU 1300. All versions were based on the same base, main column and drive system - with those models suffixed "U" having the hand feed on the table's transverse motion replaced by power only. In addition, each miller could be fitted with a table capable of being rotated a full 45?each side of central, this converting the machine into a "Universal" type and so able to be fitted with a universal dividing attachment (Type UTA 125) with power to its changewheel drive being taken from the end of the table feed-screw.
      Fitted with a 10.5" x 43.5" table, the FW 1100 had 30.75 inches of longitudinal travel and 8.75 in traverse; the other models all had a 11.75" x 51.25" table and a longitudinal travel of 35.5 inches - though the traverse remained the same at 8.75 inches. Vertical travel was a useful 16 inches, though on the combined vertical/horizontal model FWSU 1300 the design of the special milling head reduced this to 15. Table power feeds came from a separate motor and gearbox, this design doing away with the need for the universally-jointed and splined driving shafts and chains, etc. when powered from the main motor. All versions shared the same twelve rates of longitudinal feed, these being available as a choice of three ranges, in inches per minute of: 0.59 to 16; 0.9 to 24 or 1.18 to 32. Rapids, driven for safety through a Sinus-type multi-plate clutch, were set at two rates of 60 and 120 inches per minute. Lubrication of the knee and table slides was automatic with two separate pumps being employed for the purpose.
      Hardened and ground, the milling spindle was fitted with a steep-angle taper nose to DIN 2079 specification and ran in adjustable, high-precision taper roller bearings with what was described as "automatic lubrication". Spindle drive came from a 2-speed 4.5 h.p. motor on the FW 1100 and a 2-speed 6 h.p. on all other versions, the drive in every case being by the patented Klopp "friction" type where a rubber-covered roller on the motor shaft pressed against, under spring pressure, a larger wheel on the machine's input shaft. The result was a range of six speeds from 40 to 960 r.p.m. on the horizontal machines and twelve from 40 to 1360 r.p.m. on the vertical.
      The spindle and table-feed motors were both started, stopped and braked by a single lever, the operations carried out automatically in their correct sequence by simply actuating the lever - the makers claiming that
      "...no particular attention on the part of the operator is necessary?/I>"

      Klopp Knee-type horizontal milling machine FW-1100 and FW-1300 as made during the late 1950s and 1960s

      Continued:
      Of an unusual design, the head of the combined vertical/horizontal model doubled as both a vertical and horizontal unit, the assembly being flange-mounted against a gearbox that sat on top of the main column in place of the horizontal overarm. The drive came from a gear on the horizontal spindle through a two-speed gear that doubled the number of speeds from six to twelve, the range being 40 to 1360 r.p.m. Controlled by a 4-handle capstan wheel, the quill had a travel of 100 mm with the whole head able to be rotated through 180?each side of vertical. The head was arranged so that with the vertical spindle upright, the elements needed for horizontal milling were on the left-hand side, these consisting of a V-way guide with two adjustable supports that carried the horizontal cutter-holding arbor. Merely rotating the head through 90?brought it up against a stop, the arbor then being in line with the standard horizontal spindle from which it picked up the drive. Hence, the change was one mode to the other was both quick and easy and made some jobs possible with a reduced number of re-settings.
      A number of accessories were available including a rather fine, swivel-base machine vice with double-closing parallel jaws and a plain (non-quill feed) vertical milling attachment the Type VFA11 - this mouting against the horizontal apindle socket and having a horizontal throat of 11.75" and vertically of 6.5"; the spindle nose was a 4 Morse taper and the unit weighed approximately 86lbs. Another milling attachement was also offered, the Type VH60, this being of a much more useful design with a handwheel-controlled quill with a travel of 2.5" - though the feed was rapid, by rack-and-pinion gearing there being no fine-feed drive; the horizontal throat was 11.75", the vertical 3.75", the spindle nose a 4 Morse taper and the weight 110lbs. The unit could be swiveled through 360?and was fitted with step-up gearing at a ratio of 1:2 that raised the top speed to around 1920 r.p.m. Also available was a vertical-slotting attachment, the Type S.St.A.1, this having a ramstroke of 3.25", a horizontal throat of 12.5" and a weight of 99lbs. Two dividing attachements were listed: the "semi-universal" Type HU125 complete with an adjustable tailstop, mid-way support, a 24-notch index plate, three dividing plates and a catchplate. The center hight was 5" and the weight approximaely 130lbs. The other division equipment listed was a complex universal, the Type UTA125 with a center hight of 5 inches and a weight of 162 lbs. The unit was intended for mounting on the right-hand end of a table with a set of change wheels connecting it to the table's feed-screw. It was supplied with an adjustable tail stock, a mid-way support, a driver centre, a 24-notch indexing plate, three division plates and the neccecary changwheels, their mounting studs and quadrant. Intended for use with the UTA125 was the universal attachment Type UFA11, this having a horizontal throat of 11.75", a vertical of 6.75" and drive taken from the horizontal spindle with support by a drop-bracket on the end of the standard overarm. Inside the unit the initial horizontal drive was turned through two right angles to end in a 4 Morse taper socket, the whole assembly able to be rotated about its horizontal axis and the cutter head swivelled through 360 at right-angles to this - the movements allowing (in conjunction with the UTA125) the manufacture of spiral gears, worms and various kinds of milling and other multi-faceted cutters. A single rotary table was listed, the 10-inch diameter Type TRA 250 with a worm-and-wheel ration of 1 : 120 and an attached division plate - its weight was 99 lbs.
      If you have a Klopp machine tool of any type, the writer would be interested to hear from you.


      Klopp "Universal" FW-1100 and FW-1300 fitted with the swing table

      The combined horizontal and vertical Klopp model FWSU 1300

      Klopp FWSU 1300 with its swing head in position for vertical milling

      The "semi-universal" Dividing Attachment Type HU 125 with tailstock and centre support

      Vertical Milling Attachment Type VH60 with quill feed by rack-and-pinion gearing

      Slotting Head Type S.St.A.1 and the Rotary Table Type TRA 250

      Connected to the horizontal spindle socket is the Universal Milling Attachment Type UFA11 and on the table the Complex Universal Dividing Attachment Type UTA125.

      Concentric parallel-jaw machine vice on a swivelling base


      A set of catalogues is available for Klopp machines

      Klopp Shapers Web Page

      lathes.co.uk
      Klopp Milling Machines - Germany

      Klopp FW 1100, FWU 1100, FW 1300, FWU1300 and FWSU 1300
      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
      Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted  Machine Tool Manuals   
      Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

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