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      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      Jashöne Lathes


      Jashöne M-180-E

      Little known outside continental Europe, Spanish-built Jashöne lathes are comparatively rare in the UK and North America. Of all types made, the ones most likely to be encountered are, judging by the number offered for sale on the second-hand market, the conventional geared-head M-180-E and the big-bore M-215-E.
      With a centre height of 7 inches (180 mm) the M-180-E was built to DIN 8606 standards and could be ordered with 30, 40, 60 or 80 inches (750, 1000, 1500 or 2000 mm) between centres and supplied with or without a detachable gap piece - the latter fitting giving a swing of 20" with a job some 8" deep able to be mounted on the faceplate. Hardened (to 400-450 Brinell) and ground, the bed was 10.625" (270 mm) wide with V and flat ways and cast from a chromo-nickel iron smelted in an electric furnace. Common to many other Spanish lathes of the era, the bed had it front V-way constructed with its outer surface made much wider and set at a shallower angle than the (narrower and steeper) inner part.
      Powered by a 4 h.p. 1500 r.p.m. motor, a good range of twelve speeds spanning 26 to 2000 r.p.m. was available with selection by a dial and lever sharing a concentric mounting on the front face of the headstock. Electrical start, stop and reverse were controlled by a third-rod system with a control handle pivoting from the right-hand face of the apron and, on the longer bed models, another fitted at the headstock end by the screwcutting gearbox. A full-length foot brake bar was fitted between the cast-iron cabinet plinths that, in its standard form, switched off the motor when pressed and braked the spindle to a halt; upon releasing the pedal the motor did not restart. As an option the maker could set this so that, upon releasing the brake, the spindle automatically restarted.
      Bored through 1
      7/16" (37 mm), the spindle ran in taper roller bearings, had a No. 5 Morse taper in the nose and was fitted with the maker's own design of nose fitting - those wisely they also offered the options of a DIN55022 No. 6, ASA B.59-L1 or a Cam-Lock D1-6". Headstock gears and shafts were hardened and ground and lubricated by a simple splash system - an oil-sight glass being provided to check the level.
      Following common design trends of the 1970s, the lathe had a fully-enclosed, oil-bath screwcutting and feeds gearbox with dial and lever controls - the absence of a traditional sliding tumbler selector eliminating the change of dirt and swarf getting inside. The box could generate, without changing or demounting any of the changewheels, 50 Whitworth pitches (including 11.5,13 and 19), 54 metric from 0.2 to 12 mm pitch and 30 Modular from 0.07 to 1. With a diameter of 1.375" (35 mm) the 4 t.p.i. leadscrew (it was also used on the all-metric versions) was grasped by cast-iron nuts lined with replaceable bronze threaded sections.
      Power sliding and surfacing feeds were provided by a separate shaft with 154 different rates available longitudinally from 0.0009" to 0.1" (0.022 to 2.7 mm); cross feeds were, as is normally the case, set much finer at from 0.00015 to 0.02" (0.044 to 0.54 mm) per revolution of the spindle. An automatic knock-off system was provided for longitudinal (sliding) feeds with a front-mounted bar equipped with five adjustable blocks that could be arranged as the operator required.
      Strongly built, with 20" (500 mm) long arms on its saddle, the carriage had a double-walled, oil-sump apron that held hardened and ground gears and the usual worm-and-wheel arrangement to pick up the drive from the keyed power shaft. The handwheel could be supplied fitted to either the left (American) or right-hand (European) sides. A rather pleasing touch was the provision of long bed-way guards that protruded from all four wings of the apron, those at the front being so long that they were engineered to pass beneath the headstock casting as the carriage approached the spindle nose.
      Fitted with good-sized zeroing micrometer dials, the compound slide had cross and top slides with 9 and 6.5 inches (230 and 165 mm) of travel respectively.
      Equipped with two bed locks - one a quick-action can type the other a separate bolt - the tailstock had a 2.25 (58 mm) hardened and ground No. 4 Morse taper spindle that ran in a honed bore. with its travel measured by a ruler scale and a large micrometer dial. Instead of leaving the tailstock casting rounded off, the designer had taken the trouble to form this surface into a shallow but useful tool tray.
      Equipped with two bed locks - one a quick-action can type the other a separate bolt - the tailstock had a 2.25" (58 mm) hardened and ground No. 4 Morse taper spindle fitted with a zeroing micrometer dial and sliding in a honed bore.
      Spanish machine tools have always enjoyed a price advantage on the world market, their low labour, land and factory costs allowing them to not only price their products competitively but also to include a number of useful extras as part of the standard equipment. On the M-215-E these included: full electrical and coolant equipment, a 4-way toolpost, fixed and travelling steadies, thread-dial indicator, Morse taper centres, a spindle-reducing sleeve, a set of changewheels to extend the threading range and the expected spanners, test charts and an operation manual..


      Jashöne M-215-E with big-bore spindle

      Designed, with its 4-inch (104 mm) spindle bore to appeal to a market segment that needed such a facility, the 8.5 inch (215 mm) centre height the M-215-E was built to DIN 8606 standards and could be ordered  with 40, 60 or 80 inches (1000, 1500 0r 2000 mm) between centres. A detachable gap piece was standard and, with it removed, a job 22.625 inches (575 mm) in diameter and up to 8" deep could be turned on the faceplate.
      Hardened (to 400-450 Brinell) and ground, the bed was only just a little wider than on the M-180-E at 10.875" (275 mm) but usefully deeper and more rigid. Fitted with V and flat ways - and cast from a chromo-nickel iron smelted in an electric furnace - the bed featured, as did other Spanish lathes of the same era, a front V-way with its outer surface made much wider and set at a shallower angle than the (narrower and steeper) inner part. The bed was carried on a pair of separate cast-iron plinths with, between them, a large pull-out chip tray.
      Powered by a 4 h.p. 1500 r.p.m. motor, a good range of twelve speeds spanning 18 to 1000 r.p.m. was available with selection by a dial and lever sharing concentric mounting on the front face of the headstock. Electrical start, stop and reverse were controlled by a third-rod system with a control handle pivoting from the right-hand face of the apron and, on the longer bed models, another fitted at the headstock end by the screwcutting gearbox.
      Bored through  4-inches (104 mm) the spindle ran in taper roller bearings, had a No. 5 Morse taper in the nose and, because the spindle was so large and could not use a convention DIN or D-type fitting, was supplied with a simple 4-hole flange to take chucks and faceplates. Headstock gears and shafts were hardened and ground and lubricated by a simple splash system.
      Following common design trends of the 1970s, the lathe had a fully-enclosed, oil-bath screwcutting and feeds gearbox with all-lever control - the absence of a traditional sliding tumbler selector eliminating the change of dirt and swarf getting inside. The box could generate, without changing or demounting any of the changewheels, 50 Whitworth pitches (including 11.5,13 and 19), 54 metric from 0.2 to 12 mm pitch and 30 Modular from 0.07 to 1. With a diameter of 1.375" (35 mm) the 4 t.p.i. leadscrew (it was also used on the all-metric versions) was grasped by cast-iron nuts lined with replaceable bronze threaded sections.
      Power sliding and surfacing feeds were provided by a separate shaft with 154 different rates available longitudinally from 0.0009" to 0.1" (0.022 to 2.7 mm); cross feeds were, as is normally the case, set much finer at from 0.00015 to 0.02" (0.044 to 0.54 mm) per revolution of the spindle. Unlike its smaller cousin the M-180-E lacked an auto knock off system for the power longitudinal feed.
      Of identical design to the smaller M-180-E (but scaled up with a taller apron and using larger castings for the cross and top slide) the strongly built carriage had 20-inch long saddle arms and a double-walled, oil-sump lubricated apron that held hardened and ground gears. The usual worm-and-wheel arrangement picked up the drive from the keyed power shaft and the handwheel could be supplied fitted to either the left (American) or right-hand (European) sides. Fitted with good-sized zeroing micrometer dials, the compound slide had cross and top slides with 12 and 6.5 inches (305 and 165 mm) of travel respectively.
      Equipped with two bed locks that required the services of a loose, self-hiding spanner, the tailstock had a 2.4" (62 mm) hardened and ground No. 4 Morse taper spindle that ran in a honed bore. with its 8 inches (204 mm) of travel measured by a ruler scale and a large micrometer dial. Instead of leaving the tailstock casting rounded off, the designer had taken the trouble to form this surface into a shallow but useful tool tray.
      Spanish machine tools have always enjoyed a price advantage on the world market, their low labour, land and factory costs allowing them to not only price their products competitively but also to include a number of useful extras as part of the standard equipment. On the M-215-E these included: full electrical and coolant equipment, a 4-way toolpost, fixed and travelling steadies, thread-dial indicator, Morse taper centres, a spindle-reducing sleeve, a set of changewheels to extend the threading range and the expected spanners, test charts and an operation manual.


      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
      Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
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      Jashöne Lathes



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