<code id="sa0bz"></code>
    <th id="sa0bz"></th>

  1. <strike id="sa0bz"></strike>
      <strike id="sa0bz"></strike><del id="sa0bz"><small id="sa0bz"></small></del>
      <th id="sa0bz"><video id="sa0bz"></video></th>

      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
      Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
      Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

      IEC Lathes
      by Chanana Brothers, India
      REW, Coronet, Deem,
      Panther, Parmar, REW, & Savna


      If any reader has an IEC lathe, the writer would be interested to hear from


      Manufactured by the Chanana Brothers of 26, Okhla Industrial Estate, New Delhi 20 in India, the IEC range of lathes was made into the late 1970s - and possibly for longer. With a design that would have looked more at home in the 1930s, they were expressly designed (and advertised) for use in Indian workshops, where their simple yet rugged construction enabled them to survive considerable abuse. Details of two typical machines are available, the belt-driven 165 mm (6.5") centre height CB.26-1 and the 190 mm (7.5") CB.26 and the geared-head Model AG-53.
      CB.26-1 and CB.26-2
      Of identical construction, each had a 240 mm (9.5") wide, V-way bed able to turn diameters of 500 mm (19.75") and 560 mm (22") respectively in their detachable gaps and with short and long-bed versions available to take either 750 (29.5") or 1000 mm (39") between centres. Both were powered by a 1 h.p. motor, carried on a hinged plate inside a South Bend-like underdrive plinth, with drive to the 38 mm bore, long-nose American L0 taper headstock spindle by a flat belt running over 4-step pulleys. Backgears were of the conventional type, brought into action on an eccentric with a spring-loaded plunger to ensure the correct mesh. It appears that both plain bronze and taper roller bearings were offered - with the former having the spindle ground to a
      mirror finish. The 8 spindle speeds spanned 42 to 800 r.p.m., a range that was neither slow enough for the largest jobs (or screwcutting by beginners), nor fast enough for small-diameter work.
      Drive to the Norton quick-change screwcutting gearbox and 1.25" diameter 4 t.p.i. leadscrew passed through an externally-mounted tumble reverse mechanism (when most lathes of this type had long been fitted with one better supported on the inside face of the headstock). 54 inch pitches from 4 to 250 t.p.i. were available and, with the substitution of changewheels (an extra 8 were provided) 27 metric from 0.25 to 7.5 mm pitch.
      Power sliding and surfacing feeds were fitted, driven from a slotted powershaft and through the usual apron-mounted worm-and-wheel gearing. Both selection and engagement appear to have been by a single, quadrant-style lever - the lack of a clutch with this system being guaranteed to cause problems with disengagement as the drive loaded-up under a heavy cut.
      Locked to the bed by a lever protruding front its end face (an old-fashioned arrangement long abandoned by other makers) the set-over tailstock carried a spindle with a No. 3 Morse taper with a useful 145 mm of travel.
      Supplied with each new lathe was a 3-phase motor and reversing switch, fixed and travelling steadies, a simple 4-jaw chuck based on a slotted faceplate, a thread-dial indicator. chip tray and 8 metric translation gears..

      Chanana Brothers IEC Type CB.26-1 and CB.26-2 belt-drive lathe

      Chanana Brothers IEC Type AG-53 geared-head lathe - circa 1972
      Despite looking very much more modern, the AG-53 used the same 240 mm (9.5") wide V-way bed, complete carriage assembly and tailstock as the CB.26-1. However, instead of the old-fashioned reduction in section over its middle part, the bed was made full-depth for its entire length, the stand given a more angular appearance and a deep, slide-out chip tray fitted between the headstock and tailstock  plinths.  As with the belt-driven version, two versions of the geared-head model were offered, both were of identical construction, the only difference being the centre height: one of 165 mm (6.5") and the other 190 mm (7.5"). A removable gap section was standard and allowed diameters of 500 mm (19.75") and 560 mm (22") to be turned on the standard faceplates. Short and long-bed versions were offered of each type, able to take 750 (29.5") or 1000 mm (39") between centres. A 2 h.p. motor was standard and the 8 spindle speeds spanned 45 to 1000 r.p.m.


      Other Indian lathes: REW, Coronet, Deem, Panther, Parmar, REW, & Savna

      IEC Lathes
      by Chanana Brothers, India
      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
      Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
      Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

      If any reader has an IEC lathe, the writer would be interested to hear from you
      ǮֻϷ