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      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      Cadillac Lathes - Taiwan
      Cadillac Lathes Page 2 (CM1700 Series)

      A Cadillac lathe - could this be the machine-tool equivalent of a 1930s V16 Cadillac Automobile? Sadly, no, even though, cheekily, it used the same font and style of logo on its headstock - for this was not only a Taiwanese-built lathe but also and a copy of the superb, toolroom-class 17.5" swing lathe by the Japanese company Mori Seiki.
      Using a fully-geared headstock holding ground-finished, alloy-steel gears, the lathes all had hardened and ground bedways and were mounted on massive, cast-steel stands. As standard, the each Cadillac was supplied with a gapless, hardened and ground-finished straight bed - though at extra cost a detachable gap piece could be provided. To date, details of three Series of Cadillac have been found: the CM1400, CM1700 and CM2200.
      Series CM1400 lathes
      With a swing of 14 inches (a 7-inch centre height) the CM1400 could be had in three lengths as the Model 1422 that admitted 21.5 inches between centres, the 17.5-inch capacity Model 1428 and Model 1440 that could take work up to 39.5 inches long. A gap bed was optional and, when so equipped, allowed work up to 7 inches deep and 21 inches in diameter to be turned on a faceplate.
      All three lathes were of identical design and shared the same basic specification: a spindle with an ASA A-15 nose, bored through to clear 1
      17/32" and with a No. 5 Morse taper socket. Spindle speeds, driven by a 3 h.p. 220-440-volt 3-phase, 1800 r.p.m. motor were arranged in a geometric progression and ran from 83 through 155, 275, 550, 1020 to 1800 r.p.m. A safety foot brake was fitted as standard, this being coupled to the start-stop switch and no-volt release switch that prevented the machine from restarting before the switch had been returned to neutral. Control of the motor start/stop was by the usual "third-rod" system with a control lever pivoting from the right-hand face of the apron and duplicated - on models with longer beds - by a second lever just to the right of the screwcutting gearbox.
      Operated by a conventional tumbler and levers, a full screwcutting and feeds gearbox was fitted, this providing, in conjunction with a 4 t.p.i. leadscrew, 32 English pitches from 4 to 56 t.p.i. and 26 metric from 0.45 to 7 mm. By using alternative changewheels, it was also possible to generate DP and module pitches. 32 rates of feed were available that, driven by a separate power shaft, ranged from 0.0054 to 0.0480 inches per revolution of the spindle sliding and at half those rates on cross feed. Most usefully - and a great boon for safety -  the longitudinal travel could be disengaged by an adjustable stop fitted to a full-length bar mounted below the power shaft. However, on the 1400 Series lathes, this might have been something only available on the options' list, though seemingly standard on the larger models in the range.
      Power feeds were selected and engaged by a single lever on the face of the apron, this having a light and easy to engage and disengage action, the latter positive under even the heaviest cuts. The carriage handwheel was fitted with a micrometer dial that, like the ones on the top and cross slides, was locked by a face-action screw that did not, unlike some other methods, change the setting as it operated.
      Cross and top slides had travels of 9.25 and 4.5 inches respectively and were fitted with good-sized, clearly engraved and anti-glare, satin-chrome plated zeroing micrometer dials. Rather oddly, it appears that a toolpost was not supplied as part of the standard equipment, a quick-set type being on the list of optional extras.
      Clamped o the bed by an eccentric cross shaft, the tailstock could be set over for the turning of slight tapers and had a No. 4 Morse taper spindle engraved with either inch or metric ruler lines and a travel of 5.75 inches.
      The weights of the three models in the CM1400 series were, respective to their bed length: 2200 lbs, 2350 lbs and 2650 lbs.
      Details of the Series CM1700 and CM2200 follow below.

      Cadillac Series CM1400 lathe

      Cadillac Series CM1700 lathe

      Cadillac Series CM1700 lathes
      With an actual swing of 17.125" (an effective 8.5-inch centre height) the CM1700 Series could be had in four bed lengths as the short-bed Model 2233 that admitted 33 inches between centres, the Model 2260 with a capacity of 60 inches, the 2280 at 75 inches and the long-bed Model 22100 that could take jobs up to 93 inches long. A gap bed was optional and, when so equipped, allowed work up to 8.5 inches deep and 29 inches in diameter to be turned on a faceplate.
      All fours lathes were of identical design and shared the same basic specification: a spindle, supported in three precision taper-roller bearings, was identical to that on the Series CM1700 lathes with an ASA A-16 nose, bored through to clear 2
      3/64" and with a No. 6 Morse taper socket. Twelve spindle speeds were available that, driven by a 5.5 h.p. 220-440-volt 3-phase, 1800 r.p.m. motor, ran from 32 through 62, 82, 112, 160, 200, 285, 395, 510, 710, 1010 and 1800.  A safety foot brake was fitted as standard, this being coupled to the start-stop switch and no-volt release switch that prevented the machine from restarting before the switch had been returned to neutral. Control of the motor start/stop was by the usual "third-rod" system with a control lever pivoting from the right-hand face of the apron and duplicated - on models with longer beds - by a second lever just to the right of the screwcutting gearbox.
      Operated by a conventional tumbler and levers, a full screwcutting and feeds gearbox was fitted, this providing, in conjunction with a 4 t.p.i. leadscrew, 35 English pitches from 4 to 80 t.p.i. and 20 metric from 0.5 to 7 mm. By using alternative changewheels, it was also possible to generate DP and module pitches. 32 rates of feed were available that, driven by a separate power shaft, ranged from 0.0018 to 0.025 inches per revolution of the spindle sliding and at half those rates on cross feed. Most usefully - and a great asset for sale operation -  the longitudinal travel could be disengaged by an adjustable stop fitted to a full-length bar mounted below the power shaft. In addition, the feed shaft was fitted with a safety overload clutch, set so that damage to the gear train and its components was prevented.
      Power feeds were selected and engaged by a single lever on the face of the apron, this having a light and easy to engage and disengage action, the latter positive under even the heaviest cuts. The carriage handwheel was fitted with a micrometer dial that, like the ones on the top and cross slides, was locked by a face-action screw that did not, unlike some other methods, change the setting as it operated. Incorporated into the apron was an automatic pump, that when the carriage was moving, provided a supply of oil to the bed and cross slide ways.
      Cross and top slides had travels of 10.25 and 5.625 inches respectively and were fitted with good-sized, clearly engraved and anti-glare, satin-chrome plated zeroing micrometer dials. As on the smaller Series CM1400 models, it appears that a toolpost was not supplied as part of the standard equipment, a quick-set type being on the list of optional extras.
      Clamped o the bed by an eccentric cross shaft, the tailstock could be set over for the turning of slight tapers, had a No. 4 Morse taper spindle (engraved with either inch or metric ruler lines), and a travel of 5.75 inches.
      The weights of the four models in the CM1700 range were, respective to their bed lengths: 4080 lbs, 4740 lbs, 5180 lbs and 5980 lbs.
      Pictures of a CM1700 here

      Above: a Cadillac Series CM22000 lathes
      With an actual swing of 21.875 (an effective centre height of 10.9 inches) the CM2200 Series could be had in four bed lengths as the Model 1733 that admitted 33 inches between centres, the Model 1749 with a capacity of 49 inches, the 1760 at 60 inches and the long-bed Model 1780 that could take jobs up to 75 inches long. A gap bed was optional and, when so equipped, allowed work up to 8.5 inches deep and 24 inches in diameter to be turned on a faceplate.
      All fours lathes were of identical design and shared the same basic specification: a headstock spindle - the same as that used on the CM1700 lathes - was supported in three precision taper-roller bearings, had an ASA A-16 nose, was bored through to clear 2
      3/64" and machined with a No. 6 Morse taper socket. However, the twelve spindle speeds, driven by a more powerful 7.5 h.p. 220-440-volt 3-phase, 1800 r.p.m. motor, were adjusted to run a little slower and ran from 25 through 51, 68, 93, 133, 166, 237, 330, 425, 590, 840 to 1500 r.p.m.  A safety foot brake was fitted as standard, this being coupled to the start-stop switch and no-volt release switch that prevented the machine from restarting before the switch had been returned to neutral. Control of the motor start/stop was by the usual "third-rod" system with a control lever pivoting from the right-hand face of the apron and duplicated - on models with longer beds - by a second lever just to the right of the screwcutting gearbox.
      Also identical to that employed on the CM1700 lathes, the screwcutting and feeds gearbox was operated by a conventional tumbler and levers and, in conjunction with a 4 t.p.i. leadscrew, generated 35 English pitches from 4 to 80 t.p.i. and 20 metric from 0.5 to 7 mm. By using alternative changewheels, it was also possible to generate DP and module pitches. 32 rates of feed were available that, driven by a separate power shaft, ranged from 0.0018 to 0.025 inches per revolution of the spindle sliding and at half those rates on cross feed. Most usefully - and a great asset for sale operation -  the longitudinal travel could be disengaged by an adjustable stop fitted to a full-length bar mounted below the power shaft. In addition, the feed shaft was fitted with a safety overload clutch, set so that damage to the gear train and its components was prevented.
      Power feeds were selected and engaged by a single lever on the face of the apron, this having a light and easy to engage and disengage action, the latter positive under even the heaviest cuts. The carriage handwheel was fitted with a micrometer dial that, like the ones on the top and cross slides, was locked by a face-action screw that did not, unlike some other methods, change the setting as it operated. Incorporated into the apron was an automatic pump, that when the carriage was moving, provided a supply of oil to the bed and cross slide ways.
      Cross and top slides had travels of 10.625 and 56.75 inches respectively and were fitted with good-sized, clearly engraved and anti-glare, satin-chrome plated zeroing micrometer dials. As on the smaller Series CM1400 models, it appears that a toolpost was not supplied as part of the standard equipment, a quick-set type being on the list of optional extras.
      Clamped o the bed by an eccentric cross shaft, the tailstock could be set over for the turning of slight tapers, had a No. 4 Morse taper spindle (engraved with either inch or metric ruler lines), and a travel of 5.75 inches.
      The weights of the four models in the CM2200 range were, respective to their bed lengths: 4450 lbs, 5450 lbs, 6250 lbs and 6950 lbs.

      Detachable gap section in the bed

      Evidence of careful design - the face-locked micrometer dial on the cross-feed screw

      The very useful  automatic carriage travel knock-off mechanism

      The tailstock was locked to the bed by double clamps

      Equipment supplied as standard with each new Cadillac lathe

      Cadillac Series CM1400 lathe



      Cadillac Lathes Page 2 (CM1700 Series)

      lathes.co.uk
      Cadillac Lathes - Taiwan
      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
      Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
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