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      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      Bandini Universal Precision
      Milling Machines



      Manufactured by Costruzioni Elettromeccaniche Ing. Alberto Bandini in Firenze Via. Morosi, Italy, the Bandini Universal precision Milling Machine was an almost exact copy of the Mk. 1 Deckel FP1. Like all of its type, this was an ingenious, adaptable and versatile machine* that lent itself to solving a multitude of machining problems, the secret of the type's success being its ability to mount a number of different heads - horizontal, standard vertical, high-speed vertical and slotting - in combination with a variety of tables - plain, plain-tilting and compound swivelling. All the heads could be driven backwards and forwards across the top of the main column to provide an in-out feed, while the tables bolted to a flat, vertical T-slotted table equipped with power longitudinal and vertical feeds. By juggling the choice of heads and tables, and utilising other accessories, a skilled technician was seldom defeated in his attempts to produce the most complex of milled and drilled components - and all to a very high standard of accuracy.
      Fitted with a 640 x 220 mm vertical T-slotted table, the Bandini had feed travels that varied when used under power or manually - these being, respectively, 290 mm and 300 mm horizontally and 290 mm and 295 mm vertically. 14 rates of feed were available, ranging from 9.5 to 2200 mm/min both horizontally and vertically. The overarm (by which means the lateral feed was achieved) had a travel of 150 mm under hand-traverse only (from a large handwheel on the right-hand face of the column) with the No. 4 Morse taper spindle having 12 speeds from 60 to 12000 r.p.m. driven from a 1.2 kW 3-phase motor.
      Equipped as standard with a plain rectangular 640 x 220 mm T-slotted table, a maximum clearance of 360 mm was available under the cutter arbor with a minimum of 65 mm.
      As was usual with this type of machine, a number of accessories - essential to get the best from the miller - were available and included: equipment for horizontal milling; a slotting attachment; a fully universal tables that could be swivelled, inclined and tilted, a power-driven helical milling attachment; a high-speed milling head with its own motor; attachments for punch milling and die work; a precision boring head; rotary tables and dividing heads with tailstocks and hydraulic copying attachments - in other words, almost exactly the same range as offered by Deckel for their machines.
      Continued below:

      Continued:
      *Proof of the type's success - the genus
      Precision Universal Milling Machine - is evident from the number of similar machines made in various countries including:
      Austria:
      Emco Model F3
      BelgiumS.A.B.C.A. Model JRC-2
      CzechoslovakiaTOS FN Models
      England: Alexander "Master Toolmaker" and the Ajax "00", an import of uncertain origin.
      Germany: Hahn & Kolb with their pre-WW2 Variomat model
      Wilhelm Grupp Universal- Frsmaschine Type UF 20 N/120
      Hermle Models UWF-700 and UWF-700-PH
      Leinen Super Precision Micro Mill
      Macmon Models M-100 & M-200 (though these were actually manufactured by Prvomajska); Maho (many models over several decades)
      Ruhla
      Rumag Models RW-416 and RW-416-VG
      SHW (Schwabische Huttenwerke) Models UF1, UF2 and UF3
      Thiel Models 58, 158 and 159
      Wemas Type WMS
      Italy: C.B.Ferrari Models M1R & M2R
      Bandini Model FA-1/CB and badged as Fragola (agents, who also sold a version of the Spanish Meteba).
      Japan: Riken Models RTM2 and RTM3
      Poland: "Avia" and "Polamco" Models FNC25, FND-25 and FND-32 by Fabryka Obrabiarek Precyzyinych
      Russia: "Stankoimport 676"
      Spain: Metba Models MB-0, MB-1, MB-2, MB-3 and MB-4
      Switzerland: Aciera Models F1, F2, F3, F4 and F5
      Christen and Perrin Types U-O and U-1 (Perrin Frres SA, Moutier)
      Hispano-Suiza S.A. Model HSS-143
      Luthy
      Mikron Models WF2/3S, WF3S, WF-3-DCM & WF-2/3-DCM
      Perrin Type U-1
      Schaublin Model 13 and Model 22
      The former Yugoslavia: Prvomajska (in Zagreb with Models ALG-100 and ALG200)
      Sinn Models MS2D & MS4D
      "Comet" Model X8130, imported to the UK in the 1970s by TI Comet.
      United States: Brown & Sharpe "Omniversal"
      Sloane & Chace in the USA made miniature bench version and at least five Chinese versions are known, including one from the Beijing Instrument Machine Tool Works. A number of the "clones" merely followed the general layout while other,, like Bandini and Christen, borrowed heavily from Deckel and even had parts that were interchangeable. Should you come across any of these makes and models all will provide "The Deckel Experience" - though you must bear in mind that spares are unlikely to be available and, being complex, finely-made mechanisms, they can be difficult and expensive to repair..
      If any reader has a Bandini machine tool the writer would be interested to hear from you



      email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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      Bandini Universal Precision
      Milling Machines

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